good stuff we see and do
Heath 10: A Date, A Moment, A Design
The place where Robin and I and our staff have our offices, and where we make things today, is the same factory that Edith and Brian Heath designed, in collaboration with Marquis & Stoller, in 1959. To accommodate growing business, the Heaths set down roots in Sausalito and created a human-scale factory that featured an open floor plan with air flow and light. Once just an area for production, the factory is now quite a destination, with a factory store (where you can find seconds dinnerware and tile) and an outside courtyard that encourages community gathering. When we took on Heath ten years ago, we were charmed by the kinetic energy we felt when we first visited the factory. There was a tangibility between the ideas and design and production, and we felt strongly that Heath should be a transparent place where we would invite people to share in the making process. That started a new tradition of working factory tours and weekend tours for our customers, and eventually our Open Studio weekends each May and November. It’s a tradition we’re quite proud of still today. #heath10
- Cathy and Robin
(All historical photos courtesy of the Brian & Edith Heath Collection/Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley. Photos 2 and 6 courtesy Aya Brackett.)
Heath 10: A Date, A Moment, A Design
The place where Robin and I and our staff have our offices, and where we make things today, is the same factory that Edith and Brian Heath designed, in collaboration with Marquis & Stoller, in 1959. To accommodate growing business, the Heaths set down roots in Sausalito and created a human-scale factory that featured an open floor plan with air flow and light. Once just an area for production, the factory is now quite a destination, with a factory store (where you can find seconds dinnerware and tile) and an outside courtyard that encourages community gathering. When we took on Heath ten years ago, we were charmed by the kinetic energy we felt when we first visited the factory. There was a tangibility between the ideas and design and production, and we felt strongly that Heath should be a transparent place where we would invite people to share in the making process. That started a new tradition of working factory tours and weekend tours for our customers, and eventually our Open Studio weekends each May and November. It’s a tradition we’re quite proud of still today. #heath10
- Cathy and Robin
(All historical photos courtesy of the Brian & Edith Heath Collection/Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley. Photos 2 and 6 courtesy Aya Brackett.)
Heath 10: A Date, A Moment, A Design
The place where Robin and I and our staff have our offices, and where we make things today, is the same factory that Edith and Brian Heath designed, in collaboration with Marquis & Stoller, in 1959. To accommodate growing business, the Heaths set down roots in Sausalito and created a human-scale factory that featured an open floor plan with air flow and light. Once just an area for production, the factory is now quite a destination, with a factory store (where you can find seconds dinnerware and tile) and an outside courtyard that encourages community gathering. When we took on Heath ten years ago, we were charmed by the kinetic energy we felt when we first visited the factory. There was a tangibility between the ideas and design and production, and we felt strongly that Heath should be a transparent place where we would invite people to share in the making process. That started a new tradition of working factory tours and weekend tours for our customers, and eventually our Open Studio weekends each May and November. It’s a tradition we’re quite proud of still today. #heath10
- Cathy and Robin
(All historical photos courtesy of the Brian & Edith Heath Collection/Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley. Photos 2 and 6 courtesy Aya Brackett.)
Heath 10: A Date, A Moment, A Design
The place where Robin and I and our staff have our offices, and where we make things today, is the same factory that Edith and Brian Heath designed, in collaboration with Marquis & Stoller, in 1959. To accommodate growing business, the Heaths set down roots in Sausalito and created a human-scale factory that featured an open floor plan with air flow and light. Once just an area for production, the factory is now quite a destination, with a factory store (where you can find seconds dinnerware and tile) and an outside courtyard that encourages community gathering. When we took on Heath ten years ago, we were charmed by the kinetic energy we felt when we first visited the factory. There was a tangibility between the ideas and design and production, and we felt strongly that Heath should be a transparent place where we would invite people to share in the making process. That started a new tradition of working factory tours and weekend tours for our customers, and eventually our Open Studio weekends each May and November. It’s a tradition we’re quite proud of still today. #heath10
- Cathy and Robin
(All historical photos courtesy of the Brian & Edith Heath Collection/Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley. Photos 2 and 6 courtesy Aya Brackett.)
Heath 10: A Date, A Moment, A Design
The place where Robin and I and our staff have our offices, and where we make things today, is the same factory that Edith and Brian Heath designed, in collaboration with Marquis & Stoller, in 1959. To accommodate growing business, the Heaths set down roots in Sausalito and created a human-scale factory that featured an open floor plan with air flow and light. Once just an area for production, the factory is now quite a destination, with a factory store (where you can find seconds dinnerware and tile) and an outside courtyard that encourages community gathering. When we took on Heath ten years ago, we were charmed by the kinetic energy we felt when we first visited the factory. There was a tangibility between the ideas and design and production, and we felt strongly that Heath should be a transparent place where we would invite people to share in the making process. That started a new tradition of working factory tours and weekend tours for our customers, and eventually our Open Studio weekends each May and November. It’s a tradition we’re quite proud of still today. #heath10
- Cathy and Robin
(All historical photos courtesy of the Brian & Edith Heath Collection/Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley. Photos 2 and 6 courtesy Aya Brackett.)
Heath 10: A Date, A Moment, A Design
The place where Robin and I and our staff have our offices, and where we make things today, is the same factory that Edith and Brian Heath designed, in collaboration with Marquis & Stoller, in 1959. To accommodate growing business, the Heaths set down roots in Sausalito and created a human-scale factory that featured an open floor plan with air flow and light. Once just an area for production, the factory is now quite a destination, with a factory store (where you can find seconds dinnerware and tile) and an outside courtyard that encourages community gathering. When we took on Heath ten years ago, we were charmed by the kinetic energy we felt when we first visited the factory. There was a tangibility between the ideas and design and production, and we felt strongly that Heath should be a transparent place where we would invite people to share in the making process. That started a new tradition of working factory tours and weekend tours for our customers, and eventually our Open Studio weekends each May and November. It’s a tradition we’re quite proud of still today. #heath10
- Cathy and Robin
(All historical photos courtesy of the Brian & Edith Heath Collection/Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley. Photos 2 and 6 courtesy Aya Brackett.)

Heath 10: A Date, A Moment, A Design

The place where Robin and I and our staff have our offices, and where we make things today, is the same factory that Edith and Brian Heath designed, in collaboration with Marquis & Stoller, in 1959. To accommodate growing business, the Heaths set down roots in Sausalito and created a human-scale factory that featured an open floor plan with air flow and light. Once just an area for production, the factory is now quite a destination, with a factory store (where you can find seconds dinnerware and tile) and an outside courtyard that encourages community gathering. When we took on Heath ten years ago, we were charmed by the kinetic energy we felt when we first visited the factory. There was a tangibility between the ideas and design and production, and we felt strongly that Heath should be a transparent place where we would invite people to share in the making process. That started a new tradition of working factory tours and weekend tours for our customers, and eventually our Open Studio weekends each May and November. It’s a tradition we’re quite proud of still today. #heath10

- Cathy and Robin

(All historical photos courtesy of the Brian & Edith Heath Collection/Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley. Photos 2 and 6 courtesy Aya Brackett.)

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